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Law And Authority in Early Modern England Essays Presented to Thomas Garden Barnes

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Published by University of Delaware Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • British & Irish history: c 1500 to c 1700,
  • Jurisprudence & General Issues,
  • Law,
  • Legal Reference / Law Profession,
  • British Isles,
  • Essays,
  • Legal History,
  • English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh,
  • Authority,
  • England,
  • History

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsThomas G. Barnes (Editor), Buchanan Sharp (Editor), Mark Charles Fissel (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages246
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8381489M
ISBN 100874139597
ISBN 109780874139594

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  The barbarian law codes, compiled between the sixth and eighth centuries, were copied remarkably frequently in the Carolingian ninth century. They provide crucial evidence for early medieval society, including the settlement of disputes, the nature of political authority, literacy, and the construction of ethnic by: 2. By presenting original research into British legal history, this volume emphasises the historical shaping of the law by ideas of authority. The essays offer perspectives upon the way that ideas of authority underpinned the conceptualisation and interpretation of legal sources over time and became embedded in legal institutions.   Newark, DE, University of Delaware Press, , ISBN: ; pp.; Price: £ Law and Authority in Early Modern England is a tribute to a professor of law and history at the University of California, Berkeley who has for over 40 years made important contributions to early modern English history. In fact, as the editors point out, Tom Barnes . An exploration of links between opinion and governance in Early Modern England, studying moral panics about crime, sex and belief. Hypothesizing that media-driven panics proliferated in .

An exploration of links between opinion and governance in Early Modern England, studying moral panics about crime, sex and belief. Hypothesizing that media-driven panics proliferated in the s, with the development of newspapers and government sensibility to opinion, it also considers earlier. Early modern literature played a key role in the formation of the legal justification for imperialism. As the English colonial enterprise developed, the existing legal tradition of common law no longer solved the moral dilemmas of the new world order, in which England had become, instead of a victim of Catholic enemies, an aggressive force with its own overseas territories. about law, crime and power.1 Despite much activity and some advancement, the study of crime in early modern England reflects in some ways this state of affairs. It seems to be unsure of its intellectual pedigree and so is cautious and tentative. Perhaps understandably so: the field is barely 20 years old (Bailey, ;. ‘ The shaming of Margaret Knowsley: Gossip, gender and the experience of authority in early modern England ’, Continuity and Change 9, 3 (), – Fletcher, A., Gender, Sex and Subordination in England –, New Haven and London,

Addressing the role of law, morality and politics, it looks at the creation of orders which offer the possibility for global harmony, in particular the United Nations and the European Union. It also considers the unification of international commercial laws in the attempt to understand Western law in a time of accelerating cultural. The book Law and Disorder in Early Modern Wales: Crime and Authority in the Denbeighshire Courts, c. , Sharon Howard is published by University of Wales Press. The Authority of Law in the Hebrew Bible and Early Judaism Book Summary: In The Authority of Law in the Hebrew Bible and Early Judaism, Vroom tracks the emergence of legal obligation in early Judaism. He draws from legal theory to develop a means of identifying instances in which ancient interpreters treated a legal text as a source of binding. Explores the nature of authority and the cultural and social experiences of all social groups, especially insubordinates, in early modern England. Examines the ways in which young people responded.